New Form I-9
As of May 7, 2012, the old Form I-9 is obsolete and the new form must be down-loaded from www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-9.pdf?. Use of the old form is unacceptable. If Immigration Customs and Enforcement does an inspection, using obsolete forms puts an employer at risk for fines.

The instructions for the new Form I-9 are more precise and while the form is longer, it is clearer. The form requires more information from the employee to complete in Section 1, whereas Section 2 for the employer is fairly similar to the old Form I-9. The Handbook for Employers, Instructions for Completing Form I-9, found at www.uscis.gov/files/form/m-274.pdf? has been updated to address the new form and should be kept handy during the I-9 process.
E-Verify Update
As of July 1, 2013, all employers in North Carolina with 25 employees or more must enroll in E-Verify. To remind, E-Verify is a free, online database with information retrieval from the Social Security Administration, US Department of Homeland Security and the US State Department. E-Verify is only used by a designated employee to enter the new employee information into the system once the I-9 process is complete. A memorandum of understanding must be entered into between the employer and the US government prior to use and access is strictly controlled to a designated employee who must undergo online tutorials. In determining if a multi-state based employer falls within the 25 employees or more threshold, only employees in state are to be counted.
Federal Immigration Reform: Major Points
The Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act, approved May 21, 2013 by the Senate Judiciary Committee, is garnering bipartisan support and contains major changes to current US immigration law. Below are some highlights of the proposed law now being considered in Congress:

Pending NC House Bill 786: NC’s Immigration-related Legislation
This bill, whose short title is Reclaim NC Act, has passed both the House Judiciary and Finance Committees and is being discussed on the House floor this week. It has not been passed as of June 5, 2013, but Poyner Spruill will keep you updated on its passage and modifications, if any.

Following are the provisions directly relating to immigration law.

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